Saving money on clothing to spend on travel – Part 1

Saving money on clothing to spend on travel – Part 1

Adoration 4 Adventure’s recommendations on saving money on clothing to help you travel more and for longer.

I am sharing my methods of reducing your clothing expenses. Although these will be from a female perspective, the suggestions can be applied to most lifestyles. I am by no way a fashionista so this won’t be a list of places to buy discount designer brands but rather practical changes that can be applied to everyday wardrobes.

So let’s get started! Here are some easy tips on how to save which can be used for any situation, not just for your future travels.

For more budget tips, read recommendations for finding travel accommodation on a budget.

1. Minimize the contents of your closet

Knowing what you already own is the first step to being able to control your clothing costs. And it’s hard to be familiar with your inventory when your closet is packed full of clothes that you don’t even remember buying. I suggest doing a major clean out (have a supportive friend with you if necessary).

1. Go through each item in your closet and assess when the last time you wore it was.
2. If you haven’t worn it within the past 6 months – it’s going (12 months if the item is seasonal).
3. Establish 3 piles: Keeping, Donating and Trash.

Be ruthless! It may seem difficult at first, but you are really just getting rid of things that you don’t use. Also, you will feel so much better and in control when you can see and remember what is in your wardrobe. This makes it easier to make smart purchases and quickly match-up outfits.

Once you have a more slim-lined, functional wardrobe it’s important not to fill it back up with impulse purchases. Try implementing a “one in, one out” system, where you have to discard an item when you buy a new item.

colorful-clothing-save-money

2. Make sure it’s a match

Now that your closet is sorted, you will know exactly what’s in it. So when you do go shopping, make sure that you are looking for items that are versatile and work with your existing inventory. My rule is that the item must match with at least 4 other pieces in my wardrobe (I also apply this to when I am packing for a trip). There’s no point of cluttering up your closet with statement pieces that you will only wear once to a party and never be able to wear again.

3. Buy basics

Make your wardrobe even more versatile by purchasing clothing in block colors and avoiding patterns. I also steer clear of white as it tends to get marked or stained more easily. If you do decide to purchase something with a pattern, try to keep it simple by sticking to 2 colors e.g. stripes or polka dots. This will make it easier to match up with existing items. There’s nothing worse than buying a great new shirt and then realizing you only have one pair of pants that you can wear it with.

I love having basic pieces like scarves and tights. These are really functional and multi-purpose. Scarves can be used as a shawl, beach towel, sarong and pillow (a must for plane travel!). With tights, I can wear them with a shirt or under a dress. I prefer owning tights over jeans as they are also lighter to pack, take up less space and usually cheaper to buy. If tights aren’t your thing, consider buying cotton or khaki pants as an alternative.

Our packing list for cold weather travel

4. Choose quality over price

Buying cheap clothing can be a real temptation and I’m just as guilty as the next person. However, in my experience, the majority of inexpensive clothing starts deteriorating pretty fast. Not good for the environment and not good for your wallet. I would recommend choosing quality (bonus if it’s locally made and Fair-trade!) over price, for a good long-term investment.

Of course, there will be exceptions to these rules, after all, we need to get dressed up for fancy events on occasion. However, I am confident that if you apply these guidelines you will save money on clothing which you can put towards your future goals (travel or otherwise).


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Adoration 4 Adventure's recommendations on how to save money on clothing to help you travel more and for longer. Part 1 of 2.

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Top 5 tips for traveling with a food allergy

Top 5 tips for traveling with a food allergy

Adoration 4 Adventure’s top 5 tips for traveling with a food allergy.

While traveling in Europe in 2015, I experienced a number of strange symptoms that were totally new to me. Friends of mine who had food allergies recognized similarities in the symptoms and suggested that I might have some kind of gluten intolerance. I also have a lactose sensitivity and it is not uncommon to have more than one type of food allergy. I decided to cut gluten from my life, which I ended up doing for over three months. The day that I started was a sad one, particularly because carbohydrates had been my favorite food group up until that point.

Having a food allergy, intolerance or preference can mean making major lifestyle changes, however, it shouldn’t necessarily cost the things you love the most, including travel. The following are methods that I use for traveling with a food preference and could also be applied to other dietary requirements, allergies or lifestyle choices including vegetarian and vegan.

Top 5 tips for traveling with a food allergy

5. Research before you go

Some destinations are more food allergy friendly than others so it is a good idea to research your destination before you book that plane ticket. For example, if you are lactose intolerant you may find it difficult to find soy milk (or other dairy alternatives) in more remote places.

In those situations, you may choose not to travel to a destination that doesn’t have easy access to alternatives or just skip that particular food type altogether, like switching to black coffee instead of using creamer. Either way, knowing more about the destination will help you prepare and make more informed decisions.

4. Seek out food allergy friendly restaurants

Look online or use an app like Yelp to search for restaurants that are allergy friendly and see what places are in the area that serve food you can eat.

It is a good idea to call the restaurant to make sure they have the proper ingredients in stock. Also check if you need to order ahead of arrival, as sometimes they need to make your meal from scratch.

Tell everyone - Top 5 tips for traveling with a food allergy

3. Tell everyone

When dining out make sure to be upfront and clear about your food allergy with your server. It helps to say “I am allergic to ….” rather than “I have an intolerance to …”. Saying you are “allergic” is often taken more seriously and the server will be more likely to communicate this message to the kitchen. For countries with a foreign language, you could create small cards (or even pieces of paper) with a sentence in the native language stating what your allergy is.

This applies to plane travel too. When booking your flights don’t forget to indicate that you have a food allergy. The positive is that you will be served your meal first.

It is also important to tell your friends, especially when being invited over for dinner. The only thing more uncomfortable than disclosing your food allergy is to show up and have to sit there while everyone else eats. If you are worried about making a fuss, you could always offer to bring along a dish for yourself so that the cook doesn’t have to make a separate meal. More often than not, your host will be more than happy to accommodate you.

2. Cook your own

Since finding out that I had a gluten allergy, I cook more than I ever had. The upside is that I am saving more money and eating healthier.

Whenever possible, you can try this for your travels too. Either precook meals to take with you or once you arrive at your destination, head to the supermarket to purchase ingredients for cooking in your hostel/hotel kitchen.

Cook your own - Top 5 tips for traveling with a food allergy

1. Carry snacks

These days I always carry gluten free snacks on me whenever I am away from home. This way, if I find myself in a situation where there are no appropriate food options, I can fill up on fruit or a GF snack bar that I have hidden away in my bag.

There is nothing worse than waiting in an airport and realizing that there are no suitable food options for you. It is easy to pre-purchase snacks and take them on trips with you.


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Adoration 4 Adventure’s top 5 tips for traveling with a food allergy. Can also be applied to other dietary requirements and preferences.

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Travel essentials: adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes and Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket

Travel essentials: adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes and Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket

Adoration 4 Adventure’s product review of the adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes and Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket.

Do you enjoy hiking but hate getting wet and cold during the cooler months? Just because it’s winter or the rainy season, doesn’t mean that you should have to miss out going for a vigorous hike or long seaside stroll. In fact, some of the best walks can be in the worst kinds of weather!

Here in the north of Spain, we get wet winters however I have figured out a way not to let that spoil my fun. Thanks to the help of adidas, I am now prepared with a pair of Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes and Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket.

Here is my review of these great adidas products!

For more travel gear recommendations, check out my packing lists for warm weather and cold weather.

Adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women's Shoes and Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket Cudillero Spain

adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes

I love the outdoors. Whether it’s hiking in the forest, walking along the beach or pounding the pavement, it is so important to be supported by a good pair of shoes. The adidas Terrex Agravic GTX are specifically made for trail running but are so flexible that can be used for almost any kind of outdoor activity.

The adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes have the following benefits:

  • GORE-TEX® – lining for dry feet even when it’s wet out.
  • Continental® – rubber tread sole for even better traction.
  • Boost™ – providing innovative cushioning technology with a combination of softness and responsiveness to improve your running experience.

Adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women's Shoes Box

I have been testing these puppies out for over a month and couldn’t be happier with them. The fit was perfect for my whole foot – not any easy task when you have a unusual size of US 8.5. In the beginning, the material felt firm around the sides but after the first use it stretched out and now feels like I am walking on clouds.

These shoes are so stylish and have gotten me numerous amounts of compliments since I first got them. They are also lightweight with great grip for when you go off road. I wear my adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes daily to go for my hour power walk on a concrete pavement, as well as using them for when I go to the beach to walk the dog and during hikes. Even in the wet conditions, my feet always stay snug and dry.

Adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women's Shoes

Adidas Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket

Living on the coast can bring in some sudden and freezing chills, even when the sun is out. I never have to worry that I will be caught out by a change of weather or gust of wind while I am wearing my adidas Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket.

The jacket is made of 80/20 RDS certified goose down and built to keep the warm air in and the cold air out. There are heat seals around the cuffs of the sleeve and neck, as well as padded pockets to keep your hands warm. The Climaheat™ technology traps heat inside the jacket and helps it dry out faster if the outside gets wet.

Adidas Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket Front

One of my favorite features, besides the jacket being amazingly warm and water resistant, is the hidden inside pocket. I use this to hold my keys for when I am going for a long walk, instead of taking a bag with me. I’ve also worn this jacket for a night and the pockets have been large enough for me to store my phone, lip balm, and money so I don’t need to drag around a bag while I am bar hopping.

The adidas Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket has a deep adjustable hood with a small visor to provide even more protection for your face against the wind and rain.

Adidas Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket Back

Why you should buy

Adidas are market leaders for a good reason. The products that they manufacture are top of the line in innovation, technology, and quality. The company is committed to helping its customer perform better, whether it is on the court or on the trail. When you purchase products from adidas, you are choosing a world-famous brand that has a long track record of success and building trust with its customers.

Adidas-Terrex-Agravic-GTX-Womens-Shoes-and-Climaheat-Frost-Hooded-Jacket-Asturias-Beach-Spain-with-dog


Adoration 4 Adventure received a complimentary pair of Adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women’s Shoes and Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket for the purposes of completing a product review. I do not receive any commission from sales through the links in this post.

Adoration 4 Adventure partners with quality brands that are relevant to my readers. I only promote what I believe in, which is why the A4A audience can trust my recommendations.

For any queries relating to the products I have included on this website, please refer to my disclaimer and privacy policy.


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Adoration 4 Adventure’s product review of the adidas Terrex Agravic GTX Women's Shoes and Climaheat Frost Hooded Jacket - hiking and travel essentials.

Which Adidas products do you use and love? Tell us about it below!

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How much does it cost to backpack Central America?

How much does it cost to backpack Central America?

Adoration 4 Adventure’s budget breakdown of costs to backpack Central America.

If you are contemplating a backpacking trip in Central America, then this is a great place to start! After spending 9 weeks traveling to each of the 7 countries, I am sharing what I know. This is the total trip costs broken down to help you budget for your own Central American adventure.

How much does it cost to backpack Central America?

The countries in Central America will vary in price difference, as will some cities – the more touristic locations attracting higher costs. As a general rule of thumb, the cheapest countries to travel within are Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Nicaragua is slightly more expensive and gets more pricey the further south you travel. The more expensive countries to travel in are Belize, Costa Rica, and Panama.

Each country has its own charms and uniqueness so it is a shame to skip any based on budget restrictions alone. For example, I cooked more in Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama but in the other countries enjoyed the street food instead (USD $1-2.50 each for a meal). By using this article as a guide, you will be able to set your budget and expectations for whichever Central American destination you are heading to.

I traveled on a backpacking budget, e.g. hostels, budget hotels, street food and local transportation. I also traveled during the rainy season which meant off peak prices, particularly for accommodation. Although I wasn’t as strict as I could have been – splurging on ice creams, beers, and the occasion shuttle bus. So feel free to take that into consideration and adjust your budget estimates accordingly.

My average daily spend: $27 USD per person ($35 AUD as of 11 August 2016).

To help you plan your trip, I have included below:

  • The locations I stayed in
  • The daily cost for each country
  • Resource links for more information
  • Tips on how you can save even more
  • Screenshots of my budget breakdown for Entertainment, Food, Travel (Transport), Vacation (Accommodation), Health Care (I caught a bad cold!) and Automobile (Car Hire).

How much does it cost to backpack Belize?

Places I stayed: Caye Caulker, Ambergris Caye and San Ignacio (10 days in total).

Average daily spend: $40 USD per person* ($51.90 AUD as at 11 August 2016) excluding the ATM Caves tour and cost of accommodation on Caye Caulker.

*This daily amount could be reduced by sticking strictly to street food or cooking your own meals. Budget rooms on Caye Caulker start at around USD $50 per night.

Resources to help you plan:

How much does it cost to backpack Guatemala?

Places I stayed: Flores, Lanquin (Semuc Champey), Antigua and Lake Atitlan (12 days in total).

Average daily spend: 244.25 Quetzales per person* ($31.71 USD /  $41.15 AUD as at 11 August 2016).

*This daily amount could be reduced by taking local transport (see itinerary post for alternative methods), sticking strictly to street food or cooking your own meals. 

Resources to help you plan:

How much we spent backpacking Guatemala

How much does it cost to backpack Honduras?

Places I stayed: Copan Ruinas.

Average daily spend: 728.75 Lempiras per person* ($31.46 USD / $40.82 AUD as at 11 August 2016) excluding accommodation costs.

*This daily amount could be reduced by skipping certain activities or spreading them out over a longer period of time to reduce the daily cost. Budget double rooms in Copan Ruinas start around USD $15 per night.

Resources to help you plan:

How much does it cost to backpack El Salvador?

Places I stayed: Juayua, El Tunco and El Cuco.

Average daily spend: $11.30 USD per person* ($14.66 AUD as at 11 August 2016) excluding the cost of accommodation.

*Budget double rooms start around USD $29 per night. There were problems with bed bugs in Juayua, which is why I received the full refund – make sure to check your mattress carefully before taking a room.

Resources to help you plan:

How much we spent backpacking El Salvador

How much does it cost to backpack Nicaragua?

Places I stayed: Leon, Granada, Omtepe and Playa Marsella (16 days in total).

Average daily spend: $17.90 USD per person* ($23.23 AUD as at 11 August 2016) excluding the cost of accommodation in Playa Marsella and two nights’ accommodation in Granada.

*This daily amount could be reduced by sticking more strictly to street food or cooking your own meals. Budget rooms start around USD $18 in Granada and USD $20 in San Juan Del Sur.

Resources to help you plan:

How much we spent backpacking Nicaragua in USD

How much we spent backpacking Nicaragua in Cordobas

How much does it cost to backpack Costa Rica?

Places I stayed: San Jose and La Fortuna (4 days in total).

Average daily spend: $38.24 USD per person* ($49.62 AUD as at 11 August 2016) excluding the cost of accommodation in La Fortuna.

*I decided to rent a car from San Jose to La Fortuna. You could opt to travel by bus which would save you money upfront but could end up costing more if you have to catch taxis to get around the town. Budget rooms in La Fortuna start around USD $25.

Resources to help you plan:

How much we spent backpacking Costa Rica in USD

How much we spent backpacking Costa Rica in Colones

How much does it cost to backpack Panama?

Places I stayed: Bocas del Toro and Panama City (8 days in total).

Average daily spend: $20.50 USD* ($26.60 AUD as at 11 August 2016) excluding the cost of accommodation in Panama City and two nights’ accommodation in Bocas del Toro.

*The daily cost could be reduced further by sticking strictly to street food or cooking your own meals. I cooked a lot in Bocas del Toro but not in Panama City. Budget rooms start around USD $15 in Bocas del Toro and USD $30 in Panama City.

Resources to help you plan:

How much we spent backpacking Panama

All photos in this article are the were sourced from Pixabay and are free of copyrights under Creative Commons CC0.


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Adoration 4 Adventure's budget breakdown for our costs to backpack Central America. My 9 week backpacking trip broken down so you can plan yours.

Have you been to Central America before? Share your stories and budget tips below!

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10 travel mistakes and how to avoid them

10 travel mistakes and how to avoid them

Adoration 4 Adventure’s top 10 travel mistakes and how to avoid them.

When traveling, something is bound to go wrong at some point. It happens to everyone. The following are mistakes that I have made during my travels and ways they can be avoided.

Want to avoid major travel blunders? Check out a collection of travelers’ scariest stories – “Close to death”.

10. Miscommunication

One of the best things about traveling is experiencing different cultures. With that often comes different languages which can be truly interesting but also challenging. On a recent outing in the north of Spain, I was having lunch with some friends and wanted to ask for some olive oil to have with my bread. I bravely attempted to ask the waiter but instead of saying the Spanish word for “oil”, I said the word for “sprain”. Needless to say, the waiter was very confused and my friends were laughing hysterically.

How to avoid: Try to learn at least a few words of the native language for the country that you are visiting. Don’t assume that everyone will speak English, carry a phrase book or have access to a translating app while you travel.

9. Painful Sunburn

A gorgeous day on the beach can often lead you to forget all your worries, including reapplying sunscreen. During my backpacking trip to the Yucatan Peninsula, I made this exact mistake and ended up painfully sunburned. For the rest of my time, I had to stay covered up and out of the sun which is not something you want to do on a beach holiday.

How to avoid: Don’t scrimp on the sunscreen. Apply every day before you go out into the sun and reapply as directed. It’s not worth the cost of spending the rest of your trip in the shade.

beach-chairs-pixabay

8. Border Crossing Confusion

Border crossings can be confusing enough and with the added challenge of a foreign language, it is easy to make mistakes. I am embarrassed to admit that I paid for my tourist visa twice when I entered into Cambodia. In my defense I was extremely sleep deprived after a big night out. That extra $20 USD would have gone a long way in a country that sells fifty cent beers.

How to avoid: Read about the border crossing process from other travelers online by googling “border crossing in ___”. This will give you a sense of what to expect and what you will need to do so you can avoid making mistakes.

7. No place to stay

Traveling without a plan can be fun and very freeing. However it also means that transport and accommodation can be booked up before you’ve had a chance to secure your place. Recently I took a last minute trip to the south of Germany. It wasn’t until after I booked the ticket that I found out there was no hostels in the town I was visiting and that the hotels were all quite expensive. Luckily, I managed to find a Couchsurfing host at the last minute, which totally saved my trip.

How to avoid: Consider booking at least a few days ahead, especially if it is the high season and there is a high demand in the city. In some locations you will have no problem with finding accommodation last-minute, however, make sure you have a couple of backup options and a general idea of where they are located. Read our top 6 tips for finding travel accommodation on a budget.

6. Over-packing

It can be difficult to know what to pack for a new location and all too easy to over-pack. On my first trip to the U.S.A., I over-packed and then had to suffer the consequences of lugging my bulging bag around for two months.

How to avoid: It is always better to under-pack then over-pack. Ideally, traveling with a carry on sized bag will make it easier to cart your stuff around with the added bonus of avoiding checking a bag. For packing tips with a carry-on bag, check out my packing lists for cold weather travel and warm weather travel.

the-suitcase-overpacking-travel-mistakes

5. Getting sick

After months of planning and saving, it can be exhilarating to finally go on that trip that you have been waiting for. It is so tempting to go out each night with those great people you met at the hostel or on the free walking tour. But be careful that you don’t burn yourself out. Whilst on a group tour, I made the mistake of staying out late every single night. Then the following mornings, having to drag my sorry self onto the tour bus. Inevitably I got sick and was bed bound for two days, unable to use my pre-purchased ticket for Universal Studios.

How to avoid: Don’t go too hard too fast. Have the mentally that it is a marathon, not a sprint. After all, you can drink in your home town anytime but you won’t have the same opportunity to go to Universal Studios. Also if you are traveling where there local water is not safe to drink, make sure that you are purchasing pure bottled water. For more remote destinations consider investing in a water filter or iodine tablets.

4. Injuries

Getting injured sucks. Getting injured while oversees can be an absolute nightmare. Last year I hurt myself twice whilst traveling. Once I fell backwards while climbing up some rocks of a ruin. Luckily, I avoided a serious injury. Then on my trip to Anchorage, Alaska I slipped on ice and badly hurt the index finger on my right hand.

How to avoid: Take it slow and steady. Watch where you are walking. If you are going on a trip that includes hiking or climbing ruins, make sure to pack appropriate footwear. Beware of slippery surfaces and hold the handrail when taking stairs in icy climates.

3. Missing a flight

When it comes to taking transportation, travelers can be divided into two groups: punctual and tardy. However it is not always in a backpacker’s control and often transport delays can lead to missed connections. I fall into the tardy travel category, which I like to believe is because I am an optimist. During my recent backpacking trip around Europe, I missed many buses and trains due to oversleeping or just poor judgement of the time it would take to get there. The most costly of my mistakes, was when I missed my flight from New York City to Edinburgh.

How to avoid: Don’t be a tardy traveler (like me). Research the time it will take you to get from your current location to the airport, bus or train station. Include plenty of time for delays, traffic, queues and border control.

london_heathrow_t5_ab1_wikimedia

2. Losing a passport

A passport is one of the most valuable things that a traveler will carry with them. Losing a passport can mean being stranded in a country until an emergency passport is issued. This also leads to additional costs for the replacement passport and travel disruption. Whilst living in New York city, I was out on the town using my passport as identification and lost it. I applied for a replacement passport at the Australian Consulate-General which involved a hefty fee and a ton of paperwork. I also had to cancel my upcoming trips to Toronto and Montreal with no refund.

How to avoid: Keep your passport in a secure place at all times and avoid taking it out with you. Most countries will accept a foreign license as identification, however check for that specific country what their requirements are as it can vary from country to country.

1. Being robbed

Even the most seasoned travelers will either know someone who has been robbed or been robbed them-self at some point during their travels. Depending on what is taken, the repercussions could be as little as a financial loss or much more serious. I had my bag stolen once during a beach party at Coney Island, New York and my wallet stolen in my own home city of Brisbane, Australia. Both times I was not paying attention and let my guard down.

How to avoid: It is so important to remain on alert and conscious of your surroundings at all times. Take the time to research your destination to become familiar with any known tourist scams or frequent crime areas. Consider getting a wallet with a chain attached to your bag.

foreign-currency-travel-mistakes-pixabay

All photos in this article, except the feature image, are the were sourced from Pixabay and are free of copyrights under Creative Commons CC0.


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Adoration 4 Adventure’s top 10 travel mistakes and how to avoid them. When traveling, something is bound to go wrong at some point. It happens to everyone.

What are some of your biggest travel mistakes? Tell us about it below! 

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Packing list for cold weather travel

Packing list for cold weather travel

Adoration 4 Adventure’s packing list recommendations for cold weather travel, for both females and males, to fit into one carry-on suitcase per person.

If you are like me, the idea of packing for a “cold-weather” trip can be overwhelming! It’s hard to know how many layers to take. Quite often people overpack not considering the fact that as the weather is cold and you are wearing layers, items can be worn multiple times.

Well, now I have done all the hard work for you. Last November I visited Alaska for the first time and tested at this packing list. It was during their fall season, with snow and temperatures as low as -17C (0F).

So here is my recommended packing list for cold weather with enough clothing to last a minimum 6 days of wear without washing.

Heading to a hotter climate? Read my Packing list for warm weather travel.

Cold weather packing list for him

Cold weather packing list for her

  • Marmot Women's Montreaux JacketWaterproof winter coat
  • Snow boots
  • Beanie
  • Thick scarf
  • Gloves
  • 3 thermal pants
  • 3 thermal shirts
  • 6 thermal socks
  • 4 thick sweaters
  • 3 tank tops (singlets)
  • Sweatpants (for an extra layer over the thermals)
  • Pajamas
  • 6 pairs of underwear.

For more jacket suggestions, check out my review of the Berghaus Women’s Scafell Stretch Hydrodown Jacket.

For skiing and snowboarding trips add

Electronics

Toiletries

When staying at a hotel, I collect the complimentary soaps and shampoos to use on other trips. Then I always keep my toiletry bag packed and ready to chuck into a backpack when it’s time for the next adventure.

cold-weather-snow-packing-list-winter-pixabay


osprey-porter-travel-backpack-bag-black-46-literCarry-on backpack

My backpack of choice is the Osprey Porter Travel Backpack Bag, Black, 46-Liter. I am able to fit all of these items into this carry-on size bag (one per person).

Packing tips for Osprey Porter 46L

  1. Roll smaller items and store vertically inside pockets first (e.g. tank tops, shorts or men’s briefs)
  2. Place heavier items like shoes at the bottom of the bag
  3. Lay any items that need to stay flat on the bottom of the bag (e.g. shorts that don’t roll well)
  4. Put a larger item (e.g. travel towel or toiletry bag) at the very front of the bag where it is curved.
  5. Fill up space in between with larger items. Roll clothes first before placing in the bag.
  6. Place any other flat or bigger items that don’t roll on top
  7. Store your laptop in the back pocket.
  8. Put any smaller items that you need easy access to in the front pockets.

All photos in this article are the were sourced from Pixabay and Amazon and are free of copyrights under Creative Commons CC0.

This page contains some affiliate links. I may receive a small commission from purchases made through these links, however, there is no extra cost to the reader.

Adoration 4 adventure partners with quality brands that are relevant to readers. I only promote what I believe in, which is why the A4A audience can trust my recommendations.

For any queries relating to the products I have included on my website, please refer to the disclaimer and privacy policy.


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Adoration 4 Adventure's packing list recommendations for cold weather travel for both females and males, to fit into one carry-on suitcase per person.

What are your packing tips and tricks? Tell us about it below!

And if you liked the post – share it with your friends on social media.