Local guide: Milan, Italy

Local guide: Milan, Italy

Adoration 4 Adventure’s local guide for visitors to Milan, Italy by A4A guest writer, Cinzia Ferri.

Local guide posts provide recommendations for destinations from locals who are currently living or have lived in that particular place. Including information on the top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around with an emphasis on saving money.

Planning a trip to Italy? Check out the local guides to Cinque Terre, Rome, and Udine.

Overview of Milan

Milan is the second biggest city in Italy, after Rome, and one of the most underrated places in the country. If you ask Italians about Milan, they most likely will tell you that it’s an ugly industrial town, full of traffic and noise, absolutely not worth visiting. Well, that might have been true for Milan twenty years ago, nowadays – thanks to the Expo 2015 as well – it has become one of the most interesting, modern, vibrant, international Italian towns. Milan’s beauty is not as obvious as that of Rome, Florence, or Venice, but the city really has a lot to offer.

milano_galleria vittorio emanuele

Top 5 places to visit

5. Porta Nuova

This area has been completely redesigned and amazing buildings have been built in the past five years or so. The heart of the area is Piazza Gae Aulenti, a modern square titled to the famous female architect. From there, you can see all the works of architecture which have been created, most of which have also received important architectural prizes. The most important buildings are il Bosco Verticale (vertical forest), a complex of two buildings designed by Stefano Boeri, which host approximately 900 trees, the amazing Unicredit Tower by Cesar Pelli and the Palazzo della Regione Lombardia (Lombardy Region Headquarters).

4. I Navigli

The Navigli are the center of Milan’s nightlife, but they are absolutely worth visiting during the day as well. They are a network of canals, partly designed by Leonardo Da Vinci. In the past, they stretched all around the city, what remains now are just two canals: the Naviglio Grande and the Naviglio Pavese. The area around the canals is quite busy at night, while during the day is a quiet escape from the hustle and bustle of the city center. Walking there, you’ll feel like being in a small town with cozy restaurants, small shops, and art galleries.

milano_navigli_day

3. Pinacoteca di Brera

The Pinacoteca di Brera is an outstanding museum of art which contains one of the most important art collections in Italy. There you can see paintings and works of Raffaello, Piero della Francesca, Caravaggio, Tintoretto, the famous Kiss by Francesco Hayez, and many other paintings by incredible masters. When you are done with art, you could visit the adjoining Orto Botanico (Botanical Garden), which is really old and fascinating. Tickets for the museum are 10 euros, but the entrance is free on the first Sunday of the month. Entrance to the Botanical Garden is free.

milano_pinacoteca_brera

2. Cenacolo Vinciano

The real jewel of Milan is in the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie and its Leonardo Da Vinci’s Last Supper. This incredible mural painting is one of the most famous in the world and you definitely cannot miss it. Unfortunately, it has been damaged over the years, due to humidity, bad restoration attempts, and even some bombings during World War II, but it somehow managed to survive and it has now been properly restored. The entrance to the Cenacolo is strictly limited and must be booked in advance. Tickets are 12 euros.

milano_cenacolo_vinciano

1. Il Duomo

The Duomo, Milan’s Cathedral, is the symbol of the city and the most loved place in town. Locals have a particular fondness for this place and for the Madonnina, the golden statue of Virgin Mary which protects the city from high above the roof of the church. The Cathedral is totally worth visiting (entrance is 2 euros), but a visit to the roof is not to be missed as well (entrance is 9 euros if you are willing to go up the stairs) as the view is great. Close to the Cathedral is the Museo del Novecento, an amazing collection of 20th-century art (entrance is 10 euros, but it is only 6 euros every Tuesday after 2 pm and two hours before closing).

milano_duomo

Eating and drinking

Milan is incredibly full of dining and drinking options. As in every big European city, you can find more or less everything you want. Prices are not exactly cheap, though. If you are on a budget, you can solve the problem of eating something buying a slice of pizza or a sandwich in a bakery and then eating it in a public park. A true Milanese tradition is to get a panzerotto, some kind of fried turnover, at Luini: a filling and cheap option right in the city center, a few steps away from the Duomo.

Another very popular place is Spontini, which serve pizza by the slice in various city locations. If you are looking for some trendier solutions, you can try the Navigli or the Isola neighborhood, they are packed with restaurants and hipster cafès, offering all kinds of drinks and food.

milano_navigli_night

Transport

Getting around the city is very easy. There is quite an extensive public transport system: there are many metro, bus and tram lines, which take you more or less everywhere. A single ride ticket is 1,50 euros (it is valid for 90 minutes since validation, with one metro ride only), a daily ticket is 4,50 euros and it is valid for 24 hours since validation. Tickets can be bought at the automated vending machines in every metro station, at kiosks and newsagents’ around town, but not on board. Tickets must be validated before boarding.

Milan has a bike-sharing system too. You’ll find many bike stations to pick up and drop off bikes in the city center. To use the bikes you have to register on the BikeMi website. Daily subscription is 2.30 Euros, while the weekly one is 6 Euros. You’ll find all information you need regarding both public transport and bike-sharing on the ATM Milan website.

Accommodation

Milan is undoubtedly one of the most expensive Italian towns when it comes to accommodation. Finding a cheap hotel in the city can be really difficult, then. The best solution for sleeping in the city would be renting an apartment via AirBnb, which gives you the opportunity of finding accommodation in the city center without being ripped off. There are thousands of good flat and apartments around town and you can find affordable ones even in the very center.

If you are more of a hotel type, instead, it would be better to look for solution outside the city center, like for example the area of San Siro Stadium or other less central neighborhoods, from which you can easily get into the city with the metro.


Cinzia Ferri_bioA4A guest writer – Cinzia Ferri

Hi, Cinzia here! I live in Italy, I adore travelling and I am my own boss at Instantly Italy, where I help people enjoy Italy at its best. I teach Italian and create custom travel guides for independent travelers who want to see Italy with the help of a local.

Follow Cinzia at http://instantlyitaly.com/, on Facebook and Instagram.

All photos in this article are courtesy of Turismo Milano Website and flickr.


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Adoration 4 adventure's local guide for visitor's to Milan, Italy. Including top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around on a budget.

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Local guide: Cinque Terre, Italy

Local guide: Cinque Terre, Italy

Adoration 4 Adventure’s local guide for visitors to Cinque Terre, Italy by A4A guest writer, Cinzia Ferri.

Local guide posts provide recommendations for destinations from locals who are currently living or have lived in that particular place. Including information on the top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around with an emphasis on saving money.

Overview of Cinque Terre

Well, let’s just say that Cinque Terre (literally Five Lands) is not a city but five. Or better, they are five small villages which together are not even the size of a small town. Perched on the hills above the sea, they are one of the most enchanting places in the world. Located in the north of Italy, in a region called Liguria, just one hour away from Genoa and less than three hours from Florence, they are five little gems in the midst of amazing nature: Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola and Riomaggiore.

Planning a trip to Italy? Read our 24 hour itinerary for Venice and local guide for visitors to Rome.

Top 5 places to visit

5. Corniglia

Located up on a hill, far from the sea and the train station, Corniglia is the lesser known and least visited village of Cinque Terre. Busy with visiting Cinque Terre in a day trip, many tourists skip this location, making it the most untouched and real of the five villages.

4. Monterosso

Monterosso is the largest village in the Cinque Terre. Unlike the others, it has quite a big sandy beach, tourist facilities and is divided into an old and a new village.

The most important sights to visit are:

  • Torre Aurora, built on a promontory to defend the village from the barbarians
  • The Statue of Neptune, called the Giant, which overlooks the coastline
  • The caruggi (narrow alleys typical of all Ligurian towns) of the historical center.

3. Manarola

Manarola is one of the two ends of the famous Via dell’Amore (way of love), a picturesque path with a breathtaking scenery which connects the village to Riomaggiore. It is perched on a little cliff which seems to tumble down into the sea, with the houses all close together, taking advantage of the little or no space available. The not-to-be-missed places are Punta Bonfiglio and the Sanctuary of Nostra Signora della Salute and their amazing views.

In December, a lovely presepe (nativity scene) is set on the hill around Manarola.

Manarola, Cinque Terre, Italy. Photo credit: A4A guest writer, Cinzia FerrI

2. Riomaggiore

Being the first village you encounter if you come from La Spezia and the starting point of the renowned Via dell’Amore, Riomaggiore is probably the most famous – and most visited – village in the Cinque Terre. Exactly like Manarola, Riomaggiore is a group of tall houses built all together on a tiny stretch of land, with just one main road and a tiny harbour.

Riomaggiore, Cinque Terre, Italy. Photo credit: A4A guest writer, Cinzia FerrI

1. Vernazza

All five villages are nice, but Vernazza is by far the most beautiful and elegant looking. It has a small bay lined by colourful houses, an harbour with old boats and some restaurants along the square which overlooks the sea.

The main sights to visit are:

  • The picturesque church of Santa Maria d’Antiochia, which is built by the sea (you can hear the sound of waves when you are inside)
  • The Castle of the Doria with its cylinder tower
  • The Sanctuary of Nostra Signora di Reggio, which you can reach with a nice scenic walk from the village.

Vernazza, Cinque Terre, Italy. Photo credit: A4A guest writer, Cinzia FerrI

Eating and drinking

Food in Cinque Terre is great, I couldn’t describe it in any other way. The cuisine is mainly based on fish, with some vegetarian dishes as well. You can find many restaurants in each village of Cinque Terre, all of them equally good. If you decide to have lunch or dinner in a restaurant, do not miss pasta with pesto, which is typical of this area: Liguria is the just best place where you can try it. However, the star of the Ligurian cuisine is a very simple – and cheap – food: focaccia. A thin salty bread with salt and olive oil, it is sold most everywhere in bakeries and grocery stores. It is so filling that one big slice of focaccia will see you through the day, with just a few euros. If you want to feel like a local, try it at breakfast dunking it into your cappuccino.

Transport

Cinque Terre are little villages perched on tiny stretch of land, which means that visiting with a car is highly difficult. There are just a few parking spots where you can leave your car and then move around with either the train or the boat. Trains run back and forth the villages all day round, they can be crowded but are the easiest and cheapest way of moving from one village to the other.

Taking the ferry is another great – and very scenic – option of moving around. In both cases, you can buy a ticket and then hop on and off at every location. Another great option of visiting Cinque Terre is on foot, as all villages are connected by scenic paths. Unfortunately though, bad weather has caused some major landslides in the past and now some paths are closed (one of them is Via dell’Amore).

Scenic view of the water in Cinque Terre, Italy. Photo credit: A4A guest writer, Cinzia FerrI

Accommodation

Since villages are so small, the biggest accommodation problem in Cinque Terre is the scarcity of rooms available. Finding a room in a hotel during the summer can be very difficult – and expensive. You can have better luck with private rooms or apartments rented by locals, but the best option is still to find either a hotel or an apartment in a nearby town, like Levanto, Portovenere – amazingly beautiful as well – or even La Spezia, where you have plenty of accommodation choices.


Cinzia Ferri_bioA4A guest writer – Cinzia Ferri

Hi, Cinzia here! I live in Italy, I adore travelling and I am my own boss at Instantly Italy, where I help people enjoy Italy at its best. I teach Italian and create custom travel guides for independent travelers who want to see Italy with the help of a local.

Follow Cinzia at http://instantlyitaly.com/, on Facebook and Instagram.

All photos in this article are the property of A4A guest writer, Cinzia Ferri.


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Adoration 4 adventure's local guide for visitor's to Cinque Terre, Italy. Including top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around on a budget.

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Local guide: Udine, Italy

Local guide: Udine, Italy

Adoration 4 Adventure’s local guide for visitors to Udine, Italy by A4A guest writer, Sally Cochrane.

Local guide posts provide recommendations for destinations from locals who are currently living or have lived in that particular place. Including information on the top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around with an emphasis on saving money.

Overview of Udine

Udine is located in the region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia right up in the north-eastern corner of Italy. Set against the backdrop of the Alps, Udine is well-known for its grappa, San Daniele prosciutto and truffles from the north.

Bordered by Austria to the north and Slovenia to the east, Udine is just a short drive to either. Other towns within driving distance worth mentioning are Cividale (a quaint town close to the Slovenian border), Trieste (a port town and the capital of Friuli) and Lignano (a beachside town popular with locals and tourists alike).

Planning a trip to Italy? Read our 24 hour itinerary for Venice and local guide for visitors to Rome.

Udine, Italy. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Sally Cochrane

Top 5 places to visit

5. Cittá Fiera

The biggest mall in Udine. Probably more for locals, but this was the place I went shopping when I lived in Udine on student exchange. They have some great shops we can’t get back home like Accessorize, Calzedonia, Intimissimi and H&M. I remember trying the best Cannoli I ever had here and I have been forever searching for the perfect one since!

4. Castello di Udine (Udine Castle)

The castle is built upon a hill that overlooks the city of Udine. There is a legend that is passed around that claims when Atila the Hun raided the biggest city in the Roman Empire, Aquileia, he wanted a hill built to be able to see the burning from a distance. The current Castle building was constructed on the ruins of a fortress destroyed by the 1511 earthquake. It is a steep climb up, but worth it for the magnificent views.

3. Stadio Friuli

Udine’s largest stadium and home to Udinese, a club in the Serie A League. It is only a very short drive from the city centre and has hosted FIFA and UEFA Championship League games as well as major artists such as Coldplay, AC/DC and Metallica. I would definitely recommend catching a ‘calcio’, or soccer game, whilst you are there in order to fully experience the Italian enthusiasm.

2. Miramare Castle in nearby Trieste

Worth the drive or train ride from Udine, Trieste is a beautiful port town near the border of Slovenia. I visited Miramare Castle with my host family and was taken aback by the beauty of the grounds and also the history that surrounds it dating back to the 19th century. With magnificent views of the sea, ‘Miramare’ literally means to see the sea.

1. Piazza della Libertá

Stroll the piazzas of Udine town, watching the locals and stopping along the way for an Aperol Spritz at a local bar or Gelato at a hidden Gelatería like Oggi. For me, there is nothing better than spending the day living like the locals do. Not only is it cheap to do, you will have a much better experience!

Eating and drinking

My favourite thing to drink, and a specialty in the Friuli, is an Aperol Spritz. Head to any local bar and they will pour you a concoction of Aperol liqueur and white wine topped with soda. When you order, you will also get little nibbles to eat while you drink.

If you ever head out to Cividale, 30 minutes on the train from Udine, my favourite little bar is a place called Il Santo e Il Lupo (The Saint and the Wolf). A restaurant I recommend in Udine is Pizzeria Concordia, which serves great pizza and pasta at value prices. It is near the park also, so you can take a stroll after lunch.

Eating pizza in Udine, Italy. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Sally Cochrane

Transport

For me, the train was always the easiest way to get around without a car in Udine and its surrounding cities. Tickets were cheap and could be picked up at any station. Bus is also a common way to get around within the city and out to Cittá Fiera. Remember to check timetables as these can vary between summertime and wintertime. There are different types of tickets including daily, monthly and annual depending on how long you are going to be there.

There is also the FVG Card (similar to an Oyster Card in London) which lets you explore the Friuli region with ease. Just make sure you get your tickets validated on the bus!

Sally and friends in Udine, Italy. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Sally Cochrane

Accommodation

Although I didn’t have too much experience with accommodation in Udine as I stayed with a host family, I do have some recommendations for the best area to stay in. My first suggestion would be somewhere near the central train station such as Hotel Europa (I have actually stayed here for 1 night) or Hotel Principe. My second suggestion would be somewhere closer to the centre of town such as Ambassador Palace Hotel or Astoria Hotel.

Accommodation in Udine is quite reasonably priced compared to the rest of Italy at $100-150 per night for a 3-4 star hotel in a good location.

Udine, Italy at Christmas. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Sally Cochrane


A4A Guest writer - Sally CochraneA4A guest writer – Sally Cochrane

Hi, I’m Sally and I am a travel agent, foodie and blogger at Safe Travels By Sally. Among many other experiences, I have skied down the Austrian Alps on Christmas day, gone for a ride in an army tank through the mud in Slovakia and attended University in Mexico.

Follow Sally at www.safetravelsbysally.com, on Facebook and Pinterest.

If you would like to work with Adoration 4 Adventure, contact A4A.

The photo used for the feature and vertical graphic belongs to Allie Feru, www.blondeontheroad.com.  All other photos in this article are the property of A4A guest writer, Sally Cochrane.


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Adoration 4 adventure's local guide for visitor's to Udine, Italy. Including top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around on a budget.

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Local guide: Rome, Italy

Local guide: Rome, Italy

Adoration 4 Adventure’s local guide for visitors to Rome by A4A guest writer Marta Correale.

Local guide posts provide recommendations for destinations from locals who are currently living or have lived in that particular place. Including information on the top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around with an emphasis on saving money.

Overview of Rome

Rome is not only about history. The capital of Italy has a lot more to offer visitors than memories of the past. With a buzzing food scene, gorgeous weather for most of the year and stylish shops, Rome has something for everyone. How do I know? It is my home town and while I now live abroad, I go back often and play tourist in my own city!

Planning a trip to Italy? Read our 24 hour itinerary for Venice and local guide for visitors to Udine.

View over Rome. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Marta Correale

Top 5 places to visit

5. Colosseum and Roman Forum

One of the main landmarks in Rome is the ancient part of the city, made up of the world-famous Colosseum and the Roman Forum. It is possible to visit both sites purchasing tickets at the entrance (and if you like history or ancient sites, I highly recommend you to do so). What many people don’t know is that a stroll along ‘Via dei Fori Imperiali’, the street connecting the two, will offer gorgeous sights and photo opportunities! It’s the perfect way to get a taste of ancient Rome on the cheap.

Strolling between the Colosseum and the Forum. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Marta Correale

If you choose this option, make sure you also climb up to the top of Colle Oppio, the small hill in front of the Colosseum, for great views over the area. Once you are there, venture to Piazza San Pietro in Vincoli and marvel at the sculpture of Moses by Michelangelo inside the church. Cross the square and stroll down the small arched staircase there to reach ‘rione monti’ on of the most authentic parts of Rome, full of vintage shops and places to have lunch.

Rome via Dei Fori Imperiali. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Marta Correale

4. St Peter Basilica

A site of great beauty and religious significance, the basilica is well worth a visit. If you are travelling on a budget, access to the main square and church’s impressive ground-floor is free, while the climb to the top of the dome isn’t. If you can go up, you will be rewarded by amazing views. When visiting St Peter, make sure you dress appropriately – shorts and mini-skirts are not allowed, shoulders should be covered and the guardians are very strict!

St Peter Basilica by night. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Marta Correale

3. The Pantheon

Close to the Piazza Navona, both of these are iconic Roman locations and a must see place if you loved the book and film “Angels and Demons”! The best way to get immersed into the Roman charm is to take a stroll between the two. Don’t be afraid to get lost in the winding cobbled streets – they are the best part of the city! If you are here in the morning or late afternoon, head to Piazza Campo de’ Fiori. A bustling market in the morning and an amazing spot for an early evening drink.

Behind the Pantheon. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Strolling between the Colosseum and the Forum. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Marta Correale

2. The Spanish Steps

One of the most iconic corners of Rome. Romantic at all times of day, it’s especially evocative on a mild summer evening.

1. Trastevere

A fantastic neighbourhood for a meal out. Here you will find the best pizza in town, loads of dining options and a truly buzzing atmosphere.

Eating and drinking

In Rome you must eat pizza and the best pizza is found in two neighbourhoods: Testaccio and Trastevere. Both areas are known for the quality of the food and the reasonable prices and are just outside the city centre. You won’t find a bad meal there!

A lesser know fact about Rome is that the city is famous for its Jewish cuisine, best tasted in the area called ‘il ghetto’, near Piazza Venezia. If you like artichokes, ‘Roman artichokes’ are the thing to order and the choices are endless! For smaller appetites, look for ‘enoteche’, wine bars that also serve small meals. Try ‘the 313’ in Via Cavour, and ‘l’enoteca’ on campo dei fiori.

The best gelato in Rome is allegedly the one served at gelateria named ‘I gracchi’. A must have experience in Rome!

Gelato in Rome. Photo credit: A4A guest writer - Marta Correale

Transport

Rome public transport is a bit of a nightmare. It is possible to travel by bus, metro or taxi but if you can, walk! Buses are cheap (tickets are 1.50 euro for unlimited rides within 100 minutes) but they are unreliable and crowded. The metro is a slightly better option and costs 1.50 Euro per journey. The good news is that the city centre is a pleasure to discover on foot and, even though large, easy to explore!

You can buy individual bus tickets but marginally better prices exist for 24 hour, 72 hour and 7 day (24 Euro) tickets. All available at newsagents and metro stations.

Rome is served by 2 airports: Leonardo da Vinci (aka Fiumicino) and Ciampino. There is a direct train connected to Fiumicino called Leonardo express (about 9 euro one way) and Ciampino is connected by bus (about 6 Euro).

Accommodation

In Rome, there is a plethora of accommodation options. While standard hotels, especially in the city centre, can get pricey, it is also possible to visit the city on a budget without compromising too much comfort and location.

A good budget option is to stay in Monasteries. Many Roman monasteries rent out lovely, clean, well decorated rooms at low prices. Most of them do not operate curfews or enforce any rules different from a standard hotel or B&B, but be sure to check on the Monastery Stays website in advance.

The choice of hotels is endless and AirBnB is well established. The area around the Vatican and San Giovanni offer accommodation at reasonable prices, but if you can, try to stay near the Pantheon for both beauty and ease of movement.


Marta CorrealeA4A guest writer – Marta Correale

Born and raised in Rome, Marta now lives in Ireland with her husband and 2 young children. A part-time traveller in love with coffee, food and culture in all forms, Marta is the founder of Learning Escapes, a blog about slow family travel and cultural tourism.

Follow Marta at www.learningescapes.net, on Facebook and Twitter.

If you would like to work with Adoration 4 Adventure, contact A4A.

All photos (excluding the feature image and vertical graphic) in this article are the property of A4A guest writer Marta Correale.


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Adoration 4 Adventure's local guide for visitor's to Rome, Italy. Including top places to eat, drink, stay and how to get around on a budget.

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Itinerary: Venice, Italy (1 day)

Itinerary: Venice, Italy (1 day)

Adoration 4 Adventure’s 1 day backpacking trip to Venice, Italy.

I only had 24 hours in Venice and still managed to see everything I wanted, including a gondola ride for only €2. Here is how my visit went.

Planning a trip to Italy? Read our local guides for visitors to Rome and Udine.

Venice in 24 hours

I arrived by train from Udine. The Santa Lucia station was only a twenty-minute from my hostel located in the northern part of the island. After checking in and dropping off my bags around lunchtime, I found a free walking tour online. The tour was meeting close to the train station however I decided to walk the long way, going south-east then crossing back on the Rialto Bridge.

The first thing that struck me about Venice was the amount of tourists, especially around Rialto Bridge where the narrow alley ways can be clogged with people so much that it can bring you to a stand still. I was visiting during the peak season (June, July, August) however have been told that there are much fewer visitors off-peak.

After taking a few turns off the main walk ways, I found a maze of twisting alley ways all through the centre on Venice. In these little alleys, there were barely any other people and I could be by myself in the peace and quiet to enjoy the beautiful city. It’s very easy to get lost in the rabbits warren of alleys and I had to rush to make sure I was on time for my walking tour.

24 hour itinerary for Venice, Italy - Chantell Collins
The tour guide took us into the ghetto and shared with us some interesting history about Venice. The best part was when he showed us the “triagatto”. A gondola used for crossing the canal. Usually gondola rides can cost upwards of 80 Euro. However for only 2 Euro you can have a shorten experience to tick off the bucket list.

24 hour itinerary in Venice, Italy - Canals

After my mini gondola trip, I decided to separate myself from the tour early as I had limited time and a lot of group to cover. I headed straight for Piazza San Marco. After spending some time soaking in the sites of square, including Basilica Di San Marco (church) and Torre dell’Orologio (clock tower), I wandered around the city of Venice finding hidden treasures around every corner. My favorite part of Venice was getting lost and finding gorgeous views at every turn.

Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy
Venice is the most expensive city to visit in Italy, however I kept my trip cheap with pizza slices and gelato from street stores. It was an amazing trip and I would thoroughly recommend to anyone to visit.


Country Facts

Languages spoken: Italian (English widely spoken)

Currency: Euro €

Visa: Not required for Americans or Australians (Italy is a part of the Schengen region, refer to Schengen Visa website for more information).


Budget breakdown: Venice

All costs are quoted for one person and in the local currency (Euros). See below for the average daily including currency conversion to USD and AUD. We always try to find and negotiate the best prices to share with our readers. If you know of a better deal, tell us about it in the comments below.

Accommodation: Hostel (€27).

Food: Breakfast of takeaway sandwich (€4), pizza slices for lunch and dinner (€6) and gelato for dessert (€1.5o). Water refills from hostel into pre-purchased water bottle.

Activities: City Walking Tour (Free).

Transport: Walking in city (Free), traghetto gondola ride (€2).

Average daily spend*: €40.50 per day ($64.31 AUD / $45.26 USD as of 3 September 2015).


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Adoration 4 adventure's 1 day backpacking trip to Venice, Italy. Can be used a full itinerary or modified for any trip type and duration.

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